Ways to promote Recovery locally

Bringing people togetherVision for Change

The first and most important challenge in this process is bringing together

  1. People who provide mental health services (e.g. HSE staff)
  2. People use our services and
  3. Those who support them (e.g. family members, carers or community groups).

Some areas have let people know about this work by advertising in health centres, local media and through word of mouth.

Bringing people together allows the different voices to be heard and then for working groups to be formed to work on improving the quality of our services. Areas often choose 3 of the 10 ‘Recovery challenges” to work on (see below).

Getting GoingVision for Change

A clear plan of action

Often service providers from the HSE will be able to advise on what type of plan works best when recommending changes in the HSE. Service providers and family members/carers are often best placed to advise on what type of changes wouldmake the most difference to them.

Bringing these different skills together can result in a powerful and convincing plan of action.

Making it Happen

Turning words into action!

Bringing about change can be hard, and can take time. But by making sure everyone knows what needs to happen and when, change can slowly but surely take place. Key to success can be ensuring everyone is kept informed of any progress or delays, and reminding everyone of the importance of these changes.

Keeping it GoingVision for Change

It’s easy to fall back on old ways!

Keeping a new approach going can mean making sure everyone in the service knows about and understands this change. It can also mean being flexible and responding to feedback on what’s working and what’s not.

In this way, Recovery approaches -respecting and involving people who use our services - can become “how we do business around here”.

Ten Key Recovery Challenges IMROC

Ten Organisational Challenges

  1. Changing the nature of day-to-day interactions and the quality of experience
  2. Delivering comprehensive, user and family-led education and training programmes
  3. Establishing a ‘Recovery Education Unit’ to drive the programmes forward
  4. Ensuring organisational commitment, creating the ‘culture’. The importance of leadership
  5. Increasing ‘personalisation’ and choice
  6. Changing the way we approach risk assessment and management
  7. Redefining user and family involvement
  8. Transforming the workforce
  9. Supporting staff in their recovery journey
  10. Increasing opportunities for building a life ‘beyond illness’

(from Implementing Recovery: A new framework for organisational change, Sainsbury Centre, 2009).