Books on dementia

The Simplicity of Dementia 
Author Huub Buijssen, 2005

'Written in a style that is informative and accessible. Uses metaphor in a way that makes the reader at ease with the topic'.

Suitable for Carers
Review:
This book describes what dementia is but it also offers an informative read on the experience of dementia from the perspectives of both the patient and the family members. It deals with symptoms and diagnosis. It also addresses the behavioural changes and challenges to communication that are to be expected when dementia becomes part of someone's everyday experience. It gives insight into the lived, felt experience of living with dementia aside from the clinical diagnosis and trajectory of the illness. A strength of this book is how it covers topics that are specific to family carers and professional staff in a very accessible and concise manner. It touches on, for example, feelings of guilt and dealing with leaving a loved one alone in a nursing home and does this through the use of dialogue from real people e.g. relatives and hospital staff. It is a short book and is written in such a way that it can be used as a reference throughout the experience of the carer across the dementia trajectory.

The 36 Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People Who Have Alzheimer's Disease, Related Dementias, and Memory Loss
Author Nancy L. Mace, Peter V. Rabins, 2011

'Very informative and educational. A large text that can be used as a reference guide by family carers over time'.

Suitable for Carers
Review:
This book contains a lot of information for those who find themselves in the role of family carer. It is very much a guide and can be consulted regarding the majority of issues around dementia and its diagnosis along the dementia trajectory. It is written in a style that is accessible and uses vignettes throughout which help the reader to relate and comprehend what is being discussed. It manages to cover a wide variety of topics from the causes of dementia to offering advice to adolescents and young children on coping with witnessing a family member suffering from memory problems. The chapters cover issues that arise at initial diagnosis stage right through to when home care is no longer an option. It is not a book to read in one sitting - more a guide to reference along the journey of home care.