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Cookies Statement and Privacy Statement

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Cookies Statement and Privacy Statement

Clinical Trials for Cancer Drugs

A clinical trial is a research study which looks at how to treat a particular condition.  Sometimes, the particular type of cancer that a patient has might be suitable for a clinical trial. Clinical trials can allow patients access to new treatments which might help to improve their outcome. There are different types of clinical trials.

In the case of cancer drugs, a clinical trial looks at how a new drug, or a combination of drugs, works for a particular type of cancer.  If a clinical trial is relevant for a particular patient, their medical oncologist or haematologist will discuss this with them.  A clinical trial nurse at the hospital will also usually discuss the study with the patient.

A lot of cancer drugs trials are led through Cancer Trials Ireland (CTI formerly ICORG), but there are others.  If patients have questions about clinical trials, they can ask their nurse or doctor.

Useful links

  1. Cancer Trials Ireland - http://www.cancertrials.ie/clinical-trials/icorg-trials-information-for-clinicians
  2. Health Products Regulatory Authority - http://www.hpra.ie/homepage/medicines/regulatory-information/clinical-trials  
  3. Irish Cancer Society - https://www.cancer.ie/cancer-information/treatments/clinical-trials
  4. clinicaltrials.ie - www.clinicaltrials.ie/