Frequently Asked Questions - Children First

What is the legal definition of a child in Ireland?

What is the age of sexual consent in Ireland?

Do I need to report underage sexual activity to Tusla - Child and Family Agency?

Do I need to report underage sexual activity to An Garda Síochána?

Why do I have to notify An Garda Síochána about a Child Protection or Welfare Concern?

How do I make a notification to An Garda Síochána?

Does the HSE have a role in relation to child protection and welfare concerns?

Does the HSE have legal responsibilities under the Children First Act 2015?

What is a 'relevant service'?

Who are Mandated Persons?

How do I know if I am a Mandated Person?

What are the legal obligations of a Mandated Person?

Am I a Mandated Person if concerns arise outside of my work?

I work in a multi-agency team. How do I report a concern?

I am employed by the HSE but I work in a HSE funded organisation. How do I report a concern?

I don't work with children. What does Children First mean for me? 

I work in an adult based service, how could a child protection or welfare concern come to my attention? 

What protection do I have if I make a report to Tusla - Child and Family Agency?

Are there consequences for HSE staff who do not report child protection or welfare concerns?

Are there legal requirements I should be aware of?

What is a Designated Liaison Person (DLP)?

What happens after a report is made to Tusla - Child and Family Agency?

Can a report be made anonymously?

What should I do if I have made a report and I am still concerned about a child?

What happens if there is an allegation of child abuse against me or another HSE staff member?

Can a HSE staff member share information with Tusla - Child and Family Agency?

Can a HSE staff member request information from Tusla - Child and Family Agency?

Can a HSE staff member share information with colleagues?

Do HSE Staff or staff of HSE funded organisations have to provide schools with a copy of their Garda Vetting, when delivering their services within a school setting?

Do students on placement with the HSE need to complete the HSE Children First e-Learning programme?

What are the responsibilities of HSE services who take transition year students in relation to Children First?

Do transition year students on work experience with the HSE need to complete the HSE Children First e-Learning programme?

Where can I get more information on the roles and responsibilities of the HSE under Children First?

I am finding parenting difficult. Where can I get help and support?

What happens if a staff member has a child protection or welfare concern about my child?

What should I do if I am concerned about a child/my child?

I was abused as a child. Will this be reported even if I don't want it to be?

Will a HSE service continue to work with my child if there is a child protection or welfare concern reported to Tusla?

What are my rights as a parent/guardian?

What are my child's rights?

What if I am unhappy with the service I have received?

I find child abuse very upsetting. Where can I get support?

Where can I get more information?



If you cannot find the answer to your question you can contact us on childrenfirst@hse.ie
or on any of our phone numbers which are provided here.



What is the legal definition of a child in Ireland?BacktoTop

The Child Care Act 1991 defines a child as "a person under the age of 18 years other than a person who is or has been married”.



What is the age of sexual consent in Ireland?BacktoTop

In criminal law the age of consent to sexual intercourse is 17 years for both boys and girls. Any sexual relationship where one or both parties are under the age of 17 is illegal.

It is an offence for a person in authority to engage or attempt to engage in a sexual act with a child under 18 years of age.



Do I need to report underage sexual activity to Tusla - Child and Family Agency?BacktoTop

While under criminal law the age of consent to sexual intercourse is 17 years, it may not necessarily be regarded as child sexual abuse. There are certain exemptions for mandated reporting to Tusla - Child and Family Agency in relation to certain cases of underage sexual activity under section 14(3) of the Children First Act 2015. Details on these exemptions can be found in Chapter 3 of Children First: National Guidance for the Protection and Welfare of Children. In summary, if a mandated person knows or believes, based on clear, credible information and sound professional judgement, that all of the following apply, they are not required to make a report to Tusla:

  • A young person who is aged 15 years or more, but less than 17 years is engaged in sexual activity, and the other party to the sexual activity concerned is not more than 2 years older than them.
  • There is no material difference in the maturity or capacity of either young person.
  • The relationship is not intimidatory or exploitative of either person.
  • The young person has not been, is not being, and is not at risk of being harmed.
  • The young person concerned has made known their view that they do not want any information about the activity to be disclosed to Tusla.



Do I need to report underage sexual activity to An Garda Síochána?BacktoTop

There is a legal obligation to report sexual activity to An Garda Síochána. The child should be informed of any intention to report such activity to An Garda Síochána and/or Tusla - Child and Family Agency. Staff members may wish to informally consult with their local Garda Station in advance of making a report.



Why do I have to notify An Garda Síochána about a Child Protection or Welfare Concern?BacktoTop

An Garda Síochána also have statutory responsibilities for the protection of children. No child should be left in a situation which exposes them to harm. Where there is immediate or serious risk, and Tusla - Child and Family Agency is not available, contact should be made with An Garda Síochána.

In other circumstances, concerns arising about the protection or welfare of a child may also mean that a criminal offence may have been committed. If you know or believe that a serious offence has been committed against a child, and the information you have may be of material assistance in securing the apprehension, prosecution or conviction of another person for that offence, it is a legal requirement to report this to An Garda Síochána. Not to do so may be considered an offence under the Criminal Justice (Withholding of Information on Offences against Children and Vulnerable Persons) Act 2012. It is not a defence to expect that Tusla will make any necessary report to An Garda Síochána.



How do I make a notification to An Garda Síochána?BacktoTop

You can informally consult with your local Garda Station in advance of making a report. Services dealing with regular issues of concern that may fall under the requirement to report to An Garda Síochána may also consider liaising with their local Garda Station to discuss the nature of issues that arise; if they are issues that warrant a report being made to An Garda Síochána and how best to manage them.

A template Notification to An Garda Síochána has been developed for completion by HSE Staff when they need to make a notification under the Criminal Justice (Withholding of Information on Offences against Children and Vulnerable Persons) Act 2012.



Does the HSE have a role in relation to child protection and welfare concerns? BacktoTop

Yes. Children First is very clear that all individuals and agencies, particularly those that provide services to children, or that are in direct contact with children, have responsibilities under Children First.

The responsibilities of the HSE under Children First are:

  • to promote the welfare of children at all times even when not directly working with a child (a service may be working with a parent);
  • to be alert to the possibility that children who use HSE services may be suffering from abuse or neglect;
  • If any member of staff has reasonable grounds for concern that a child has been, is being, or is at risk of being abused, they have a responsibility to make a report to Tusla - Child and Family Agency;
  • to ensure that staff who work in the HSE, and organisations which are funded by the HSE, undertake training in recognising and responding to child protection and welfare concerns;
  • to ensure that relevant staff or volunteers have been Garda vetted, references have been checked and they have been provided with induction, training, a probationary period and on-going supervision and management;
  • to develop policies, procedures and guidance in line with Children First.



Does the HSE have legal responsibilities under the Children First Act 2015? BacktoTop

As a provider of ‘relevant services’ under the Children First Act, all relevant services in the HSE are legally required to:

  • keep children safe from harm whilst availing of its services.
  • carry out a risk assessment of any harm to a child while availing of HSE services.
  • prepare and publish a Child Safeguarding Statement that outlines the policy and procedure which are in place to manage identified risks.
  • appoint a relevant person to be the point of contact in respect of the child safeguarding statement.



What is a relevant service? BacktoTop

A ‘relevant service’ is a service or organisation that, due to nature of the service, has a statutory responsibilities under the Children First Act 2015. A full list of relevant services is available in Schedule 1 of the Children First Act 2015.



Who are Mandated Persons? BacktoTop

Certain individuals known at Mandated Persons have statutory responsibilities under the Children First Act 2015. Mandated Persons are people who because of their qualification, training and/or employment, are in a key position to help protect children from harm.



How do I know if I am a Mandated Person? BacktoTop

To find out if you are a mandated person check Schedule 2 of the Children First Act 2015.

It is the responsibility of individual staff to identify if they are a mandated person particularly staff members that are registered professionals regardless of role or grade.



What are the legal obligations of a Mandated Person? BacktoTop

Mandated Persons have two main legal obligations under the Children First Act 2015 in relation to reporting and assisting.

The Children First Act 2015 places a legal obligation on Mandated Persons to report child protection concerns at or above a defined threshold to Tusla - Child and Family Agency. A mandated person must report to Tusla without delay, any knowledge, belief or reasonable suspicion that a child has been harmed, is being harmed, or is at risk of being harmed. This includes where a child discloses their belief to a mandated person that they have been, are being or are likely to be harmed. Harm is defined in the Act as assault, ill-treatment or neglect of the child in a manner that seriously affects or is likely to seriously affect the child’s health, development or welfare; or any concern regarding sexual abuse.

A mandated person is required to assist Tusla, in their assessment of any concern which has been the subject of a mandated report, if requested.

For additional information see Chapter 3 of Children First: National Guidance for the Protection and Welfare of Children (2017).



Am I a Mandated Person if concerns arise outside of my work? BacktoTop

The legal obligation to report under the Act applies only to information that you acquire in the course of your professional work or employment. It does not apply to information you acquire outside your work, or information given to you on the basis of a personal rather than a professional relationship. While the legal obligation to report only arises for employment or professional duties, in the interest of protecting all children and young people, you should report all reasonable concerns to Tusla - Child and Family Agency.



I work in a multi-agency team? How do I report a concern? BacktoTop

If you work in a HSE led multiagency team you need to follow the HSE reporting procedure and you need to inform your line manager/supervisior when a child protection or welfare report is made to Tusla - Child and Family Agency, or where a decision is made not to report a concern.

If the team is led by a HSE funded or voluntary organisation or a HSE contracted organisation you need to follow the reporting procedure of that organisation, and also inform your line manager/supervisor when a report is made to Tusla, or where a decision is made not to report a concern.

Where a staff member of a multi-agency team has a child protection or welfare concern that does not relate to a child under the multi-agency team case load, the reporting procedure in the staff member's employing organisation should be followed.

If you are still unclear about any issues in relation to reporting child protection and welfare concerns you should speak to your line manager or most senior staff member available



I am employed by the HSE but I work in a HSE funded organisation. How do I report a concern?BacktoTop

HSE staff who work in external services should follow the reporting procedure of the external organisation and inform their HSE line manager/supervisor when they report a child protection or welfare concern to Tusla - Child and Family Agency, or where a decision is made not to report a concern.



I don’t work with children. What does Children First mean for me?BacktoTop

Child protection is everyone’s responsibility. Adult based services play an important part in the identification and assessment of child protection and welfare concerns. Consideration of the impact of parental problems on a child or children should be a routine part of practice in adult as well as in children’s services.

It is HSE policy that all staff comply with Children First and the HSE Child Protection and Welfare Policy.



I work in an adult based service, how could a child protection or welfare concern come to my attention?BacktoTop

If you are a professional who works with or treats persons with mental health difficulties, intellectual disability, addiction or domestic violence issues you must consider the welfare and safety of any children in that person’s family and/or children in regular contact with the person. You may find yourself working with people whose health and behaviour has harmed or may harm a child.

You may observe or hear of concerning behaviours that give you reasonable grounds for concern about a child.

You must always inform Tusla - Child and Family Agency when you have reasonable grounds for concern that a child may have been, is being or is at risk of being abused or neglected.

Some adults may disclose abuse that took place during their childhood. Such disclosures may come to light when an adult is attending counselling, receiving palliative care, or is being treated for psychiatric or other health issue. Where a report relates to a retrospective child abuse disclosure, a Retrospective Abuse Report Form (RARF) should be submitted to Tusla.

Where a retrospective abuse disclosure gives rise to a current concern for the protection or welfare of a child, a Child Protection and Welfare Report Form should also be sent to Tusla.

Tusla's web portal is the preferred method for reporting. Alternatively the reporting forms can be completed and sent to Tusla by registered post. 



What protection do I have if I make a report to Tusla – Child and Family Agency?BacktoTop

Under the Protections for Persons Reporting Child Abuse Act 1998 persons are protected by law if they reasonably and in good faith report suspected child abuse to a Designated Officer of the HSE, Tusla or a member of An Garda Síochána. This means that even if a communicated report of child abuse proves unfounded, a person who took an action would have to prove that the person who communicated the concern had not acted reasonably and in good faith in making the report. Section 4 of the Act protects employees from penalisation by employers for having made a report of child abuse.

The Protections for Persons Reporting Child Abuse Act 1998 makes it an offence to report child abuse to the appropriate authorities “knowing that statement to be false”.



Are there consequences for HSE staff who do not report? BacktoTop

Staff may be subject to a range of consequences for failing in their duty of care to a child. This may include:

For further information see Section 10.3. & 10.4 of the HSE Child Protection and Welfare Policy (2019)



Are there legal requirements I should be aware of? BacktoTop

Yes, there are a number of relevant Acts that HSE staff should be aware of. These are detailed in the HSE Child Protection and Welfare Policy (appendix 2).



What is a Designated Liaison Person (DLP)? BacktoTop

Children First: National Guidance for the Protection and Welfare of Children (2017) recommends that organisations that are providing services to children should consider appointing a Designated Liaison Person. The Designated Liaison Person acts as a resource person for any staff member who has child protection concerns, to ensure they follow the correct reporting procedures. 

This is not a statutory obligation under the Children First Act 2015 or a requirement under the HSE Child Protection and Welfare Policy.

This role was considered by Senior Management to be a potential barrier to the implementation of the HSE Child Protection and Welfare Reporting Procedure.
Given line management responsibilities within the HSE to support their staff to adhere to and follow procedures, it was decided that a direct line of responsibility should be maintained between line managers and staff, particularly staff who are Mandated Persons as their reporting responsibility cannot be discharged by another person.

Where senior management consider that delegating functions to a person(s) would assist the implementation of Children First in a particular HSE service, due to its needs or circumstances, they may appoint/delegate such a resource. If such resource is put in place, Line Manager responsibility in relation to decisions made by their staff must be preserved.



What happens after a report is made to Tusla - Child and Family Agency? BacktoTop

Tusla’s first consideration on receiving a report of a concern is always the immediate safety of the child. All reports and information are “screened” on the day that they are received, to determine if emergency action is necessary to protect a child. Tusla reviews the reports to determine whether they are appropriate to their welfare and protection services and, if so, what intervention is appropriate to meet the needs of the child and their family.

Tusla will always seek to acknowledge a report of a concern, and are legally required to acknowledge a mandated report.

Please refer to Tusla’s guidance document “A Guide for the Reporting of Child Protection and Welfare Concerns”.



Can a report be made anonymously? BacktoTop

While reports can be made anonymously to Tusla - Child and Family Agency  this will limit Tusla’s ability to assess and respond to concerns. No assurance of anonymity can be given to a member of the public reporting a concern as their identity may be accessible under Freedom of Information legislation or through a court process.

HSE staff have a duty of care to safeguard children, and when making reports to Tusla in their professional capacity there should be no expectation of anonymity.

If you are a mandated person you cannot submit a mandated report anonymously, as to do so would mean you are not complying with your obligations under the Children First Act 2015.



What should I do if I have made a report and I am still concerned about a child? BacktoTop

If, having made a report to Tusla’s social work service, you remain concerned about the safety or welfare of a child, you should contact the Social Work Team in the area where the child resides to discuss the concern. It may be necessary to make subsequent reports where there are on-going concerns, where further information is available, or where new concerns arise. Do not assume that a child is safe because a report has been made.

In an emergency or if a child is at immediate risk and you cannot make contact with the Tusla Duty Social Worker you should contact An Garda Síochána immediately.



What happens if there is an allegation of child abuse against me or another HSE staff member? BacktoTop

If an allegation is made against a staff member the safety and welfare of the child must always take priority and be the centre of any decisions made. The organisation also has duties and responsibilities to employees to ensure that allegations are dealt with in accordance with the principles of natural justice.

Where an allegation of abuse or neglect has been made about a staff member, a dual reporting procedure must be followed. This includes both of the following:

  • The child protection concern must be reported to Tusla as per the HSE Child Protection and Welfare Reporting Procedure, and
  • The Trust in Care Policy must be instigated by a line manager or Human Resources personnel in respect of the staff member against whom the allegation of abuse has been made.

For further information see: Trust in Care Policy for Health Service Employers on Upholding the Dignity and Welfare of Patient/Clients and the Procedure for Managing Allegations of Abuse against Staff Members



Can a HSE staff member share information with Tusla - Child and Family Agency? BacktoTop

The following general principles should be observed in relation to information sharing and confidentiality:

  • Where the interests of the parents and the child appear to conflict, the child’s interests must be paramount in relation to child protection and welfare issues.
  • The safety and welfare of children is paramount and staff must always consider the safety and welfare of a child or young person when making decisions on whether to share information about them.
  • Giving information to a person who has a bona fide need-to-know for the protection of a child is not a breach of confidentiality or data protection, where the best interests of the child or young person require it.
  • Where the disclosure of confidential information is necessary, the ‘need to know’ principle should apply, i.e. only those who need to know should be given the relevant information.
  • All relevant and proportionate information regarding a reasonable concern, a report, or the assessment of a child protection or welfare concern, should be shared with Tusla in the best interests of the child.
  • Information sharing should be consistent with the Information Sharing Framework as outlined in the HSE Child Protection and Welfare Policy. If in doubt about what information should be shared, consult with your line manager.
  • Information should be accurate and up-to-date, shared in a timely fashion and in a secure manner.



Can a HSE staff member request information from Tusla - Child and Family Agency? BacktoTop

You can, at any time, contact the Duty Social Worker to request information in relation to what action may be taken in response to your report. There may be limits to what Tusla can discuss with you however, due to confidentiality and the rights of children and families.



Can a HSE staff member share information with colleagues? BacktoTop

The Data Protection Acts 1988 and 2003 do not prevent the sharing of information on a reasonable and proportionate basis for the purposes of child protection.

Please see HSE Child Protection and Welfare Information Sharing Framework.

Where Tusla - Child and Family Agency share information with a person in the course of carrying out an assessment of a mandated report, it is a criminal offence under Section 17 of the Children First Act 2015, for that person to disclose the information to a third party, unless in accordance with law, or unless there is written authorisation from Tusla. It is important to note that it is only information shared by Tusla during the period of assessment of a mandated report that is covered by Section 17 of the Act.



Do HSE Staff or staff of HSE funded organisations have to provide schools with a copy of their Garda Vetting, when delivering their services within a school setting? BacktoTop

No. Provided the school is not employing, contracting or placing the individual concerned in relevant work (as defined in the National Vetting Bureau (Children and Vulnerable Persons) Act 2012) with children or vulnerable adults or that it is not permitting the individual to undertake the relevant work concerned on behalf of the school, there is no statutory obligation on the school in respect of the vetting of that individual.

However, given schools’ general duty of care it may be helpful if the HSE service or relevant employing organisation (in the case of HSE Funded or contracted organisations) could provide an assurance to the schools concerned that the individuals have been vetted.

Further details are available on - https://www.education.ie/en/Circulars-and-Forms/Active-Circulars/cl0031_2016_faq.pdf



Do students on placement with the HSE need to complete the HSE Children First e-Learning programme? BacktoTop

All students on placement in a professional capacity and adult students are required to complete the mandatory children first e-Learning programme.



What are the responsibilities of HSE services who take transition year students in relation to Children First? BacktoTop

The majority of transition year students are under 18 years old and are therefore identified as a child under the Children First Act. HSE services must complete a Child Safeguarding Risk Assessment and Child Safeguarding Statement, which should include any risks of harm to transition year students in the service while on work experience. A copy of the Child Safeguarding Statement should be made available to transition year students and they should be informed about the service’s child protection and welfare policy.



Do transition year students on work experience with the HSE need to complete the HSE Children First e-Learning programme? BacktoTop

As a transition year student on work experience with the HSE you should be fully supervised at all times by a staff member. For this reason it is not mandatory for you to complete the HSE Children First e-Learning programme. With parental consent, you may wish to complete the programme for your own learning experience.



Where can I get more information on the roles and responsibilities of the HSE under Children First? BacktoTop

For further information please see the HSE Child Protection and Welfare Policy.



I am finding parenting difficult, where can I get help and support? BacktoTop

Being a parent is rewarding but it can bring its own challenges. Getting help and support is important. Friends, family and neighbours who have been through similar experiences can be a source of support or you can ask your GP or Public Health Nurse about community resources available.

The HSE has created a website www.mychild.ie to support new parents and parents-to-be. It contains information on pregnancy and the first three years of your child’s life. Parenting support is also provided by Tusla – Child and Family Agency. Visit www.tusla.ie for further information.



What happens if a staff member has a child protection or welfare concern about your child? BacktoTop

The HSE has a responsibility to put the welfare of children first and report reasonable grounds for concern in respect of child protection and welfare concerns to Tusla- Child and Family Agency. All HSE staff who work within the HSE, and within organisations which are funded by the HSE, undertake training in recognising and responding to child protection and welfare concerns. The welfare of children is of paramount importance.

HSE staff may become aware of such concerns through their contact with children, but also through their contact with parents who attend adult services.

It is HSE policy that these concerns be discussed with you prior to reporting unless doing so would place a child at greater risk.

It is important to note however that where a HSE staff member has reasonable grounds for concern, it is HSE Policy that they must report this to Tusla, even if you request that they don’t.



What should I do if I am concerned about a child/my child? BacktoTop

You can contact the Duty Social Worker in the area where the child lives to get advice and information without making a formal report. If you have a concern about your child, you can make a report directly to Tusla - Child and Family Agency Duty Social Worker. This can be done in person, by phone or in writing.

If you or your child are attending a HSE service, you can also make a report to a HSE Designated Officer.

If you make a report about a child protection or welfare concern in good faith believing your concerns to be true, you are protected from being sued under the Protections for Persons Reporting Child Abuse Act 1998.

In an emergency or if a child is at immediate risk and you cannot make contact with the Duty Social Worker in the Child and Family Agency you should contact An Garda Síochána immediately.



I was abused as a child. Will this be reported even if I don’t want it to be? BacktoTop

If any child protection issues arise, including disclosures of retrospective abuse, this information must be passed on to Tusla - Child and Family Agency where there are reasonable grounds for concern that abuse has occurred, as there may potentially be children currently at risk (identifiable or not).

Your service provider should have discussed this with you at the beginning of their contact with you. If they have not, please bring this up and discuss it with them so that you are clear of what actions may be taken in the event they have a concern.

The HSE National Counselling Service is available to offer support to any adult who has experienced childhood abuse.



Will a HSE service continue to work with my child if there is a child protection or welfare report made to Tusla? BacktoTop

Yes, the HSE will continue to work with you and your child. In some very limited circumstances where a child is receiving a specific therapeutic service, it may be necessary to postpone some element of that service for a brief period while a child protection assessment is being undertaken by Tusla - Child and Family Agency. If such a decision is required, this should be discussed with you to agree the best course of action.



What are my rights as a parent/guardian? BacktoTop

  • to be treated with courtesy and respect;
  • to be heard and listened to;
  • to be consulted and involved in matters that concern your child(ren);
  • to seek legal advice;
  • to ask questions and seek explanations;
  • to be supported;
  • to access the HSE complaints process if you are dissatisfied with the service made available to your and your child;
  • to have an interpreter (if you have difficulty communicating in English or if your hearing is impaired);
  • to have your cultural and religious background taken into account.

A proper balance must be made between protecting children and respecting the rights and needs of parents/guardians and families. It is HSE policy that where there is conflict around a child protection or welfare concern that the child’s welfare must come first.



What are my child’s rights? BacktoTop

The HSE seeks to promote the rights of all children under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989. These include:

  • to be heard, listened to and taken seriously;
  • to be consulted and involved in all matters and decisions that affect their lives (taking into account their age and level of understanding);
  • to be protected from harm and discrimination;
  • to be supported;
  • to ask for explanations.



What if I am unhappy with the service I have received? BacktoTop

The HSE actively encourages all service users to comment, compliment or complain about any service(s) provided by the HSE and is committed to ensuring the safety and welfare of all children/young people with whom we work. You can let us know what you think by accessing, “Your Service, Your Say”. All responses are forwarded to relevant managers where a complaint is made and where a compliment is received.

If you are dissatisfied with a decision made by Tusla - Child and Family Agency please see www.tusla.ie/about/feedback-and-complaints.



I find child abuse very upsetting. Where can I get support? BacktoTop

The HSE National Counselling Service welcomes calls from adults who have experienced abuse in childhood. It is a professional, confidential counselling and psychotherapy service available free of charge in all regions of the country.

Connect is an additional service to the HSE’s National Counselling Service. Connect provides counselling services by telephone which may suit some people better. To speak to a counsellor call Freephone:

  • Republic of Ireland: 1800 477 477
  • UK and Northern Ireland: 00800 477 477 77
  • Outside RoI and UK: 00353 (0) 1 865 7495 (Int. call rates apply)

Rape Crisis Network Ireland is the representative, umbrella body for Rape Crisis Centres across Ireland who provide free advice, counselling and support for survivors of sexual abuse.

HSE staff should make contact with their line manager for support if appropriate or contact the HSE Employee Assistance and Counselling service (EACS) directly.



Where can I get more information? BacktoTop

If you have a query in relation to your responsibilities under Children First please email: childrenfirst@hse.ie

Please refer also to the HSE Child Protection and Welfare Policy.

Children First: National Guidance for the Protection and Welfare of Children is available to download at: https://www.dcya.gov.ie/documents/publications/20171002ChildrenFirst2017.pdf.

Useful Links:

HSE Children First Website:  www.hse.ie/childrenfirst

Child and Family Agency: www.tusla.ie

Department of Children and Youth Affairs: www.dcya.gov.ie



If you cannot find the answer to your question you can contact us on childrenfirst@hse.ie
or on any of our phone numbers which are provided here.